Media Academy » Overview

The Salzburg Global Media Academy is a unique three-week action research and critical making program that brings young media makers together from around the world to critique and create civic media for social change. The academy focuses on responding to the wicked problems of the world, and values human connections and co-creation of media initiatives to solve them. We focus on developing media and digital literacies that can be applied to inform intractable issues that face us today. The arc of the Academy is as follows:

  • Mission - The Salzburg Academy challenges students and faculty to harness creative media to inform global problem-solving.
  • Vision - Our vision is to encourage a generation of innovators in journalism, communications research and information design who can drive institutional and community change at scale.
  • Strategy - Our strategy is to convene extremely promising students from highly diverse backgrounds, expose them to leading thinkers and practitioners, and support breakthrough collaborations that result in implementable practices, technologies, and designs.
  • Program - We partner with selected universities to identify students with remarkable promise, and to create a laboratory environment where media innovation can flourish, face-to-face and virtually.
  • Outcomes - Salzburg Academy faculty and fellows deploy media applications, analysis and reporting to produce specific breakthroughs in problem framing, understanding and solution.

Over 70 students and a dozen faculty from all five continents gather annually in Salzburg to work in international teams and across disciplines. Since be founded in 2007, a global network of young media innovators has emerged, with over 830 students, 175 faculty, and a host of visiting scholars and practitioners. In this time, participants in the Academy have built:

  • Prototypes plans for media innovation
  • Global Case Studies that explore media's role in the world across borders, cultures, and divides
  • Digital Vignettes that show media's impact on the world
  • Global Media Literacy Models for engaging communities to be more sustainable and vibrant in digital culture
  • A Network of young media innovators that work to lead and invent the future media industries best suited for success in digital culture

We have had the pleasure of welcoming the following visiting scholars:

  • Richard Goldstone - South African judge who helped bring down the Apartheid / UN chief prosecutor
  • Dana Priest - Pulitzer-prize winning journalist for CBS / Washington Post
  • Richard Ford - Pulitzer Prize Winning Author
  • Bianca Jagger - Social Activist
  • Tom Stoppard - Playwright
  • Henry Jenkins - Founder, MIT Center for Civic Media
  • Anthony Kennedy - US Supreme Court Justice
  • Liz Lufkin - Yahoo News front page editor
  • Charles Sennott - founder of the GlobalPost
  • Will Dobson - foreign policy editor at Slate
  • Lucio Mesquita - director, BBC Monitoring
  • Martin Weiss - Head of Press Dept, Austrian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • Maya Morsi - UNDP Egypt
  • Ivan Seigal - Director, Global Voices

Upcoming Sessions in 2018:

Salzburg Global Media Academy
July 15 to August 4, 2018

 

What Media Can Change

Architects of the Future
Architects of the Future
Louise Hallman 

When Clemens Heller, Richard Campbell, and Scott Elledge convened the first “Salzburg Seminar in American Studies” in 1947, they were reacting to a continent ravaged by two World Wars in just three decades. Inspired by the Marshall Plan for Economics, they sought to launch a “Marshall Plan for the Mind” to reinvigorate European and American intellectual capacity, strengthen connections across the Atlantic, and heal deep post-war rifts. 

Fast forward nearly 70 years and Salzburg Global Seminar continues to forge breakthrough ideas and collaborations that bridge global and local divides. Our mission to challenge current and future leaders to solve issues of global concern calls for courage and creativity across generations and sectors.  

Most of Europe may no longer be ravaged by war, unlike some regions, but it faces spiraling tensions that can only be resolved through youth engagement and long-term vision. The recent financial and Euro crises, as well as attempts to accommodate desperate waves of refugees crossing the Mediterranean in search of safety in the European Union, have pushed European institutions, governments, and communities to the brink. New solutions and new energy are sorely needed.  

“As a trusted neutral organization that has witnessed conflict on its doorstep for decades, Salzburg Global has the responsibility to think and act long-term beyond narrow interests,” explains Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine. Our multi-year programs not only seek to address immediate problems facing individuals and institutions, but also systemic challenges, identifying levers for sustainable and socially just change at all levels. 

Many of Salzburg Global’s 2015 programs addressed critical issues faced by young people around the world. These included Youth, Economics, and Violence: Implications for Future Conflict, held in partnership with the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, which tackled the interconnected problems and opportunities of burgeoning youth populations and marginalized youth in key cities and regions. Early Childhood Development & Education and Untapped Talent: Can Better Testing and Data Accelerate Creativity in Learning and Societies – both in partnership with ETS – examined ways to improve education and social care systems from early years to university to ensure that all young people have the opportunity to fully develop and realize their potential. Two off-site panel discussions in Vienna on Educating Young People for the Jobs of the Future and Washington, DC on The Immigration Crisis: A Preview of Things to Come? explored the need for labor markets and societies to accommodate technological disruption, changing demographics, and human mobility.  

In addition to youth futures in the areas of education, employment, and civic engagement, Salzburg Global’s 2015 programs also concentrated on finance and corporate governance systems that shape the prospects of – and will be shaped by – upcoming generations. It is vital to include rising and non-standard perspectives in these high-level dialogues, explains Salzburg Global Program Director Charles E. Ehrlich: “They question conventional thinking, enabling established participants to reassess today’s systems in the light of global challenges.”  

Younger professionals need to be at the table not only because they broaden perspectives, but also because they will be the architects of transnational systems on which future prosperity, environmental protection, and the achievement of global agendas such as the UN Sustainable Development Goals will depend. Engaging fresh talent on equal terms is the way Salzburg Global leverages new voices, new brains, and new geographies. 

“By bringing smart young voices to the center of interdisciplinary discussions, Salzburg Global empowers next generation leaders to influence current policymakers and affect positive change into the future,” adds Ehrlich. 

To equip youth from all backgrounds to become effective leaders, it is critical to invest in their human capital development. Salzburg Global not only opens up opportunities for informal mentoring and network growth through attending sessions on topics from health care innovation to the future of financial regulation, but also runs dedicated capacity-building programs, such as the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum), the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change, and the now-independent Global Citizenship Alliance

Participating in the annual YCI Forum in Salzburg helps teams of innovators from city hubs around the world develop new skills focused on intra- and entrepreneurship, the latest digital resources, new business models, risk-taking and innovation, the psychology of leadership and emotional intelligence, and cross-cultural communication and negotiating skills. They leave “turbo-charged” to expand their work in their communities. This motivation and upskilling is all the more valuable, as many of these city hubs face significant economic, political, cultural, and/or racial stress.  

Reflecting on his participation in the YCI Forum, David Olawuyi Fakunle from Baltimore, MD, USA, said: “I will look back on Salzburg as the five days that changed my life. It gave me a glimpse into what the world can be when everyone is driven by understanding, cooperation, and social good. It is comforting and personally it has strengthened my purpose. Just as importantly, I left with a plan for action. That is what I needed, and the fact that I received it will take my efforts to provide healing in Baltimore to the next level.” 

Dafni Kalafati from Athens, Greece added: “What I took back home was a heart full of joy and a mind full of inspiration. Bringing together so many innovative minds can only create a better world to live in.”  

Heller, Campbell, and Elledge would likely agree.

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Salzburg Global Fellow Updates - April 2016
Our featured April Fellows
Salzburg Global Fellow Updates - April 2016
Patrick Wilson & Rand El Zein 
Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Email Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke.
Anwar Akhtar is a Fellow who participated in various Sessions including as a faculty member of the 2014 Salzburg Global Media Academy and as a facilitator of both sessions of the Young Cultural Innovators Forum - Session 538 and Session 554. Akhtar’s latest project is a film entitled ‘Karachi – A City of Children’. The film depicts Karachi, a city that holds 20 million people with thousands of children living on its streets. It explores how child exploitation is part of metropolis’s economic sector from refuse collection to industry. The film interviews the people of Azad Foundation, whom have been working since 1998 to provide welfare for the street children in Karachi.  The film was made by Karachi University School of Visual Arts as part of the Pakistan Calling film project from The Samosa in partnership with the RSA. For more information about the issues of child welfare work in Karachi, please visit: Azad Foundation and KVTC  You can watch the full film below. Bharat Doshi is a Fellow of Session 550 | Corporate Governance in the Global Economy: The Changing Role of Directors and Session 384 | Asian Economies: Regional and Global Relationships. He also hosted the Fellowship event India’s Role in a Globalized World: New Priorities and Expanded Horizons. Doshi has been appointed as Director at the Reserve Bank of India. Mahindra Group chairman, Anand Mahindra said: “Bharat has been an integral part of the Mahindra growth story and a solid pillar of the Group for over 40 years." You can read the full article here. Another Fellow from Session 550, Christian Mikosch, together with colleagues at international law firm Wolf Theiss commented on the consequences of the Panama Papers, while also stressing the importance to not forget about the "forgotten" tax havens within the United States and the related implications for trans-atlantic trade relations. You can read the full article (in German) here. Khaled El Hagar, Fellow of Session 403 | From Page to Screen: Adapting Literature to Film, has released his new film Sins of the Flesh. The film examines revenge, passion and the misuse of power and concerns five people who live on a desert farm during the Egyptian revolution. A French review of the movie by Le Monde can be read hereEun-Kyoung Kwon is a Fellow from Session 556 | International Responses to Crimes Against Humanity: The Challenge of North Korea and the manager of the International team at the International Coalition to Stop Crime against Humanity in North Korea (ICNK). ICNK has produced a motion graphics video that provides an easy summary of the Commission of Inquiry report. It shows the fundamental human rights violations the North Korean regime (DPRK) has committed, according to the UN General Assembly and the UN Human Right Council. The video specifically tackles the issue of freedom of thought and expression. Kwon claims that the next motion graphics ICNK plans on producing confronts the matter of Freedom of Religion in North Korea.  You can watch the first CIO Report video about freedom of thought and expression below. Pam Veinotte and Daniel Raven-Ellison, Fellows of Session 557 | Parks for the Planet Forum: Nature, Health and a New Urban Generation, are to be featured as guest speakers at the Urban Biosphere Initiative webinar (URBIS Dialogue) on May 12th from 16:00 to 17:15 CEST. URBIS Dialouge 12 is produced by IUCN and ICLEI and will be on the topic of connecting cities and their natural area regional networks of green spaces. Lead speaker, Chantal van Ham, EU Programme Manager Nature Based Solutions in the IUCN EU Representative Office in Brussels, will guide the discussion on investing in nature within and beyond urban boundaries that can offer a valuable economic return for cities as well as looking into the potential of unconventional partnerships and innovative ways to connect cities and urban dwellers to natural landscapes that can provide significant benefits in their day to day lives. You can register for the webinar at the link here. Sara Watson, a Fellow from Session 542 Early Childhood Development and Education, is the Global director of ReadyNation, a business membership organization that advocates for investments in children and youth in order to improve the economy and workforce. ReadyNation is co-sponsoring the First Early Education Action Congress, hosted by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on June 6 and 7, in Paris. Watson is also moderating a panel at the congress on the topic ‘Building Unexpected Advocates for Early Childhood.’ Watson claims that “This is an exciting opportunity to explore not just what early childhood services should be, but how to build the public and political will to give all children access.”  For more information about the congress visit the Ensemble for Education Program website here.  As well as this, ReadyNation’s first international newsletter on global business actions on early childhood is now available. To subscribe, please click this link
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Students from Around the World Gather to Use Media Literacy to Change the World
Students from Around the World Gather to Use Media Literacy to Change the World
Salzburg Global Seminar staff 
Seventy-six students from 20 countries on five continents came together with three major global partners in Salzburg, Austria this month with one shared goal: to discover how digital media can tackle issues of both local and global concern.   The international cohort of the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change, together with the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre and Global Voices, and led by academic, development and media experts, sought to develop innovative media tools to better understand media literacy and address challenges from climate change to women rights. Now in its ninth year, the Salzburg Academy began in 2007 as a partnership between Salzburg Global Seminar and the International Center for Media and the Public Agenda at the University of Maryland. This partnership has now expanded to include universities from across the world, as well as international media and development organizations.  During the three week program at Schloss Leopoldskron, home of Salzburg Global Seminar, the students participated in skill-enhancing workshops and intense small group discussions; attended expert-led lectures; and ultimately developed case studies, innovative strategies, and media tools with the goal of creating real life impact in their local and global communities. Building on last year’s work with the UNDP’s Knowledge, Innovation and Capacity Group (KICG), the 2015 program – Civic Voices: Justice, Rights and Social Change – engaged another two international groups: the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre and Global Voices. The three partners presented the students with a specific challenge for which they had three weeks to develop media-based solutions: empower women, improve community resilience to climate change-induced disasters, and increase civic engagement through enhanced technology and online communities.  The program was led by a keynote speech from Lucio Mesquita, Director of BBC Monitoring, on “Monitoring the News and the Challenges News Providers Face in Digital Era,” as well as lectures from representatives of each partner organization. Margot Steenbergen, a program officer from the Climate Centre, conducted a gaming workshop with students to help them understand the value of games in creating awareness about complex issues like climate change. Maya Morsy, regional gender team leader for the UNDP Regional Bureau of Arab States in Egypt, discussed the role media can play in empowering women through better representation. Ivan Sigal, Executive Director at Global Voices, discussed the power of the internet and online media in reaching communities under-represented in mass media and increasing civic engagement. Faculty from partner universities, guest lecturers, and visiting scholars, guided the students as they worked in small groups critically analyzing the three problems presented to them and developing in-depth case studies that reflected the issues of climate change, women’s rights and lack of online resources on a global scale and the role media can play in countering them. Case studies done by students presented diverse innovative solutions to issues like gender inequality within media industry, promoting marginal communities online, and building community resilience: Empowered by Art: Breaking gender stereotypes I Create Change: Building online presence for marginalized communities Floods in Europe and United Sates Books on Board: Bringing Education to Girls In addition to lectures and workshops, the students were also treated to the world premiere of long-serving faculty member Roman Gerodimos’s short films, At the Edge of the Present, a short film on “urban coexistence,” as well as an advanced preview of the forthcoming A Certain Type of Freedom, which focuses on youth and the city. Students also worked in teams to produce their own videos, led by award-winning documentary makers Sanjeev Chatterjee and Rhys Daunic. These videos have now been collected into a “mosaic” showcasing their three weeks’ work. Students also worked on individual videos for their media action plans: Gender Inequality: #KarimWaLayla Comic Floodbuddies: Urban Resilience My Voice: Marginalized communities breaking stereotypes Soap Opera on Radio: Empowering Malian Women All participants took part in a weekly photo contest with the themes “I share therefore I am,” “Never mistake motion for action” and “All change comes from inside”. Outside of lecture halls and seminar rooms, students also got a chance to travel to the Mauthausen Memorial, the site of the former Nazi concentration camp. Mohammad Hasan, graduate student at Jordan Media Institute, had applied for the program because he wanted to learn “how we can engage together in an action and bring change regardless of our thoughts and ideologies.” “This experience will contribute in shaping new thoughts for me that will reflect on my community and my friends and my family, how to engage with them in an environment that encourages all of us to participate,” he said. Encouraged by her professor back at home, Leonida Kombo, an undergraduate student at Daystar University had applied for the Academy because she wanted to meet people from different countries. She said her time at the Academy has been an inspiring one, especially her interaction with other students. “You see things from a different perspective, you are in a new environment where people have different ideas on things. And things you thought were normal all over the world might just be unique to your own country and you start to appreciate people’s differences when you actually get to interact with them first hand.” As it has been from the start, the Salzburg Academy is not just “on Media” but also “Global Change,” and in the words of famed anthropologist Margaret Mead, chair of the first ever session of Salzburg Global Seminar: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.” 
The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is held in partnership with American University of BeirutAmerican University of SharjahBournemouth UniversityJordan Media InstituteEmerson CollegeIberoamericana UniversityPontificia Universidad Catolica ArgentinaSt. Pölten University of Applied SciencesChinese University of Hong KongUniversity of MarylandUniversity of Miami,University of Rhode IslandUniversity of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.
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Maya Morsy - "A good opportunity to hear and listen to perspectives from different countries"
Maya Morsy - "A good opportunity to hear and listen to perspectives from different countries"
Rachitaa Gupta 
The UNDP has partnered with the annual Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change for a second time to present the students with a challenge and encourage them to come up with innovative media solutions for the same in the three weeks they will be working at the Academy. Maya Morsy, a Salzburg Fellow, and the regional gender team leader for the UNDP Regional Bureau of Arab States in Egypt, visited the academy to discuss the women related issues that UNDP is working on in 18 Arab countries, including Egypt. “Our work is focused in the Arab region like the gender based violence, engendering the government portfolio from legislation to access to justice and services, in addition to the environmental package of climate change and sustainable development. I, of course, work with peace and security agenda, especially in the Arab region, where there are some countries either in conflict, prone to conflict or in the transitional reform of democracy,” explained Morsy. Morsy believes that in the current situation there are several opportunities and challenges for the women’s rights based issues to be discussed and made a priority, especially in the countries facing conflict, where there is a need to increase the women’s presence at the negotiation tables during the peace process. More women, she said, were needed in the decision making process and in the parliament to raise the concerns of the women from their perspective. “Opportunities and challenges are the two faces of the same coin. The immediate opportunity we have is the reconciliation, the national dialogue, and the peace negotiations in the Arab counties, especially those in conflict….. “At the same time it is a challenge because still we [women] are not seen as a part of the peace and negotiation table. Our hope is to make sure more women are a part of this process because this will be an opportunity for women to appear on an equal foot with men in the peace dialogue and in the framing of the political future of their countries,” said Morsy. She also stressed the role of media in empowering women and presenting their issues in a positive light. According to Morsy, media needs to focus on the role models and powerful women while simultaneously move away from stereotypes when portraying them in different contexts. She also insisted on a more sensitive coverage of stories like gender based violence. “If we see role models in the media, if we see decision makers who are powerful and are doing real change on the ground, it will help in affecting and impacting more women in the legislation and in the parliament. We see media as a very strong tool that with a real message to change the community, a real message to create a social impact, can really help women and gender equality agenda,” Morsy emphasized. She considers the Salzburg Media Academy to be an ideal platform to discuss the relationship between media and women’s rights issues and to come up with innovative ways to improve it. The diversity that the seventy-six students present at the Academy, Morsy believes, will create the perfect atmosphere to discuss this topic comprehensively, and develop media tools that could be applied by the UNDP in their work of achieving gender equality. “I think the combination of students we have this year, from Arab to western, is a good opportunity to hear and listen to perspectives from different countries and maybe a solution in one country could be applied to another Arab country,” Morsy said. She also expressed her desire for this partnership, of the academy with the UNDP, to continue in the future with more of her colleagues coming to share their expertise with the students in the coming years. “It is a great honor for UNDP Regional Bureau of Arab States to be partnering with the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. We hope it can be a ritual to bring more UNDP colleagues to the academy. We have media, sustainability development, we have economic empowerment, different colleagues that could partner with the Salzburg academy. Looking forward to more UNDP colleagues coming next year.”

To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of BeirutAmerican University of SharjahBournemouth UniversityJordan Media InstituteEmerson CollegeIberoamericana UniversityPontificia Universidad Catolica ArgentinaSt. Pölten University of Applied SciencesChinese University of Hong KongUniversity of MarylandUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.

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Short Films Premiere at Salzburg Media Academy
Short Films Premiere at Salzburg Media Academy
Salzburg Global Seminar staff 
Long-serving faculty member Roman Gerodimos premiered his two short films at the ninth annual Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change on Monday, August 3, 2015. Students of the program were treated to the world premiere of At the Edge of the Present, a short film on “urban coexistence”, as well as an advanced preview of the first cut the forthcoming film A Certain Type of Freedom, which focuses on youth and the city. Gerodimos, principal lecturer in Global Current Affairs in the Media School at Media Academy partner school, Bournemouth University and leading commentator on Greek political affairs, acted as producer on the two short films, which are narrated by London-based actor, Sam Booth. Ahead of the premier, Gerodimos explained that the two films are “slightly experimental in nature.” “They blend primary and secondary academic research with photos from 40 cities from around the world in an effort to communicate ideas and debates around cities, urban coexistence, young people and media to broader audiences,” he added. In addition to Monday’s screening, the films are available online via Vimeo, and will be screened at academic conferences and festivals around the world. For more information on the films and other works of Roman Gerodimos, please visit: http://www.romangerodimos.com/  

To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of BeirutAmerican University of SharjahBournemouth UniversityJordan Media InstituteEmerson CollegeIberoamericana UniversityPontificia Universidad Catolica ArgentinaSt. Pölten University of Applied SciencesChinese University of Hong KongUniversity of MarylandUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.

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Ivan Sigal - "I am interested to see whether students here might come up with some other model that we haven’t thought of"
Ivan Sigal - "I am interested to see whether students here might come up with some other model that we haven’t thought of"
Rachitaa Gupta 
Global Voices has partnered with the ninth annual Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change to present students with a challenge and encourage them to come up with innovative media solutions for the same in the three weeks they will be working at the academy. Established in 2005, Global Voices, is an online volunteer community of 800 writers, analysts, online media experts, and translators that curates and verifies underreported stories from 167 countries and translates them in to 35 global languages. “Global voices is a community of largely volunteer writers, editors and translators from all over the world, who concentrate on reporting and covering conversation, stories and perspectives that come out of citizen media, blogs, social media that focus on the global south,” explained Ivan Sigal, a Salzburg Fellow and the Executive Director at Global Voices. He had last visited Salzburg Global in 2009 when he participated in the Strengthening Independent Media initiative. Global Voices was founded with the objective of providing an online platform that could pick up “stories that are underrepresented or misrepresented coming out of localities and making them understandable and finding larger audiences for them.” “It is about not just the right to be heard but the opportunity to listen across cultures, across countries and across languages,’ said Sigal. Through a large base of volunteer translators, Global Voices publishes stories in 35 global languages. Since, for the most part, it is the volunteers who translate the stories, they also get to decide which stories get translated in to which languages, based on their interest. “Well it may be true that in few world languages there’s international news. In many languages there’s not very much. So it’s actually an interesting resource to help people find information about other countries in languages they can read,” reiterates Sigal. The online media platform doesn’t just strive to make stories from marginalized communities global, but also wants to reach these groups with stories from other parts of the world. However, due to several inequities, lack of resources, economic barriers, and government policies, there are lot of barriers that prevent them from reaching these populations. Sigal said the question of overcoming these barriers and gaps was a core part of their work and something they were constantly working on, like by speaking out against online censorship and supporting new ways for people to gain access to the Internet. “We have two major programs. One, which focuses on restriction to access because of development issues, inequities, economic-political barriers, gender barriers, and resource barriers. And one about rights, about restrictions to speech, surveillance, privacy rights, and censorship. So it’s a big part of what we do," he specified. Bridging communities is just one of the challenges that they are facing. Sigal said making the online communities like theirs relevant at a social scale was also important. This was the challenge that Global Voices decided to present to the students of the media academy. “How do we grow, how do we make our work viable and interesting, relevant for societies? And that means both - do we grow in a way that is more inclusive, that changes the structure of the information sharing or do we seek to grow by sharing and syndicating our content and republishing it so that it is seen by a social level audience. And those things are not mutually exclusive. We are working on both models and I am interested to see whether students here might come up with some other model that we haven’t thought of,” he said. As this is the first time Global Voices has partnered with the media academy, Sigal stated he was more curious to see the results of the three weeks of collaborations between the students. “I am always interested to hear from and get feedback from communities outside of Global Voices about our work. I am very interested in critical thinking about what we do, which always helps us to become better. And I thought this would be a great opportunity for us to learn to see what others think about our work and also to present our work to other people. And hopefully to share some of our experiences with the academy.”

To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of BeirutAmerican University of SharjahBournemouth UniversityJordan Media InstituteEmerson CollegeIberoamericana UniversityPontificia Universidad Catolica ArgentinaSt. Pölten University of Applied SciencesChinese University of Hong KongUniversity of MarylandUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.

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Margot Steenbergen - "I am very curious to see through all that brainstorming what comes out of it"
Margot Steenbergen - "I am very curious to see through all that brainstorming what comes out of it"
Rachitaa Gupta 
Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre has partnered with the ninth Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices - Justice, Rights and Social Change to present students with a challenge and encourage them to come up with innovative media solutions for the problem in the three weeks they will be working at the academy. The Climate Centre, a Public Benefit Organization under Netherlands law, is a specialist reference centre of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) with the aim to help the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and its partners reduce the impacts of climate change and extreme-weather events on vulnerable people. “In our work, we combine science, policy, and practice. And in order to ensure that valuable information is retained, we have taken up an increasingly large role in the field of learning and uptake,” explained Margot Steenbergen, Program Officer at the Red Cross and Red Crescent Climate Centre. Steenbergen is mainly involved in learning and the uptake of information. She led a workshop at the media academy, where students got to play a game developed by the Climate Centre to understand the value of climate services and its uses during policy making. “It [games] is found to be particularly effective over the years… Games are a fun but serious way of helping humanity tackle the complexities, volatilities and uncertainties that could be the hallmarks of the “new normal” for the global climate. But I think it is not just the games. We make use of a larger toolbox of participatory methods," shared Steenbergen. A part of Climate Centre team has just begun work on the CRUA project – Community Resilience in Urban Areas, which is targeting: Hungary, Northern Ireland, and Denmark and has decided to share this project with the students as a challenge to come up with innovative media solutions for it during the three weeks of the media academy. “Over the last years there is found to be an increase in floods happening [in European nations] and damage was happening as a result of these floods. Not only to properties but also to human lives. I believe over 3.4M people were affected since 2004,” stated Steenbergen. Large amount of people are being affected during flooding in urban settings, especially in British Isles and Central Europe, and Steenbergen said their research shows that people in European setting depend on authorities a lot during disasters. "Certain situations extend beyond the capacity of the authorities and hence, it can be helpful for people to be resilient," said Steenbergen. The CRUA project focuses on empowering urban population by building their emotional and community resilience to better respond to natural disasters as a community and decrease their dependency on the authorities. “It is simply impossible to rely on authorities for everything. We can for lot of things and systems are in place and work really well but you cannot deal with every single vulnerable person or object and try to ensure their safety. It is not feasible,” emphasized Steenbergen. She said that was just part of the problem though. The other issue during such disasters was the lack of “social cohesion”, a characteristic of rural areas, in the urban settings. “Our aim is to increase the community resilience in these urban settings by ensuring two things – better preparedness for both, before and after a flood. So, what are we doing, having the roles better defined, for example, through family plans and community plans. Other is aiming for an increase in cohesion in doing so. It doesn’t look at material damage alone but also at the psychosocial aspect of it.” According to Steenbergen, the project, she presented the students with, focuses on creating innovative tools for community engagement in European settings and “is slightly out of the ordinary for us, but I think particularly well suited for the purpose of this academy.” “I am very curious to see what is next. I know this is a very intense process for the students. They have extremely long days. They are all stuck here in this mini reality so I am very curious to see through all that brainstorming what comes out of it.”

To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of BeirutAmerican University of SharjahBournemouth UniversityJordan Media InstituteEmerson CollegeIberoamericana UniversityPontificia Universidad Catolica ArgentinaSt. Pölten University of Applied SciencesChinese University of Hong KongUniversity of MarylandUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.

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