Media Academy » Overview

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change is a unique three-week action research and critical making program that brings young media makers together from around the world to critique and create civic media for social change. The academy focuses on responding to the wicked problems of the world, and values human connections and co-creation of media initiatives to solve them. We focus on developing media and digital literacies that can be applied to inform intractable issues that face us today. The arc of the Academy is as follows:

  • Mission - The Salzburg Academy challenges students and faculty to harness creative media to inform global problem-solving.
  • Vision - Our vision is to encourage a generation of innovators in journalism, communications research and information design who can drive institutional and community change at scale.
  • Strategy - Our strategy is to convene extremely promising students from highly diverse backgrounds, expose them to leading thinkers and practitioners, and support breakthrough collaborations that result in implementable practices, technologies, and designs.
  • Program - We partner with selected universities to identify students with remarkable promise, and to create a laboratory environment where media innovation can flourish, face-to-face and virtually.
  • Outcomes - Salzburg Academy faculty and fellows deploy media applications, analysis and reporting to produce specific breakthroughs in problem framing, understanding and solution.

Over 70 students and a dozen faculty from all five continents gather annually in Salzburg to work in international teams and across disciplines. Since be founded in 2007, a global network of young media innovators has emerged, with over 750 students, 150 faculty, and a host of visiting scholars and practitioners. In this time, participants in the Academy have built:

  • Prototypes plans for media innovation
  • Global Case Studies that explore media's role in the world across borders, cultures, and divides
  • Digital Vignettes that show media's impact on the world
  • Global Media Literacy Models for engaging communities to be more sustainable and vibrant in digital culture
  • A Network of young media innovators that work to lead and invent the future media industries best suited for success in digital culture

We have had the pleasure of welcoming the following visiting scholars:

  • Richard Goldstone - South African judge who helped bring down the Apartheid / UN chief prosecutor
  • Dana Priest - Pulitzer-prize winning journalist for CBS / Washington Post
  • Richard Ford - Pulitzer Prize Winning Author
  • Bianca Jagger - Social Activist
  • Tom Stoppard - Playwright
  • Henry Jenkins - Founder, MIT Center for Civic Media
  • Anthony Kennedy - US Supreme Court Justice
  • Liz Lufkin - Yahoo News front page editor
  • Charles Sennott - founder of the GlobalPost
  • Will Dobson - foreign policy editor at Slate
  • Lucio Mesquita - director, BBC Monitoring
  • Martin Weiss - Head of Press Dept, Austrian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • Maya Morsi - UNDP Egypt
  • Ivan Seigal - Director, Global Voices

Upcoming Sessions in 2017:

Salzburg Academy on Media and Social Change
July 16 to August 5, 2017

 

What Media Can Change

Maya Morsy - "A good opportunity to hear and listen to perspectives from different countries"
Maya Morsy - "A good opportunity to hear and listen to perspectives from different countries"
Rachitaa Gupta 
The UNDP has partnered with the annual Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change for a second time to present the students with a challenge and encourage them to come up with innovative media solutions for the same in the three weeks they will be working at the Academy. Maya Morsy, a Salzburg Fellow, and the regional gender team leader for the UNDP Regional Bureau of Arab States in Egypt, visited the academy to discuss the women related issues that UNDP is working on in 18 Arab countries, including Egypt. “Our work is focused in the Arab region like the gender based violence, engendering the government portfolio from legislation to access to justice and services, in addition to the environmental package of climate change and sustainable development. I, of course, work with peace and security agenda, especially in the Arab region, where there are some countries either in conflict, prone to conflict or in the transitional reform of democracy,” explained Morsy. Morsy believes that in the current situation there are several opportunities and challenges for the women’s rights based issues to be discussed and made a priority, especially in the countries facing conflict, where there is a need to increase the women’s presence at the negotiation tables during the peace process. More women, she said, were needed in the decision making process and in the parliament to raise the concerns of the women from their perspective. “Opportunities and challenges are the two faces of the same coin. The immediate opportunity we have is the reconciliation, the national dialogue, and the peace negotiations in the Arab counties, especially those in conflict….. “At the same time it is a challenge because still we [women] are not seen as a part of the peace and negotiation table. Our hope is to make sure more women are a part of this process because this will be an opportunity for women to appear on an equal foot with men in the peace dialogue and in the framing of the political future of their countries,” said Morsy. She also stressed the role of media in empowering women and presenting their issues in a positive light. According to Morsy, media needs to focus on the role models and powerful women while simultaneously move away from stereotypes when portraying them in different contexts. She also insisted on a more sensitive coverage of stories like gender based violence. “If we see role models in the media, if we see decision makers who are powerful and are doing real change on the ground, it will help in affecting and impacting more women in the legislation and in the parliament. We see media as a very strong tool that with a real message to change the community, a real message to create a social impact, can really help women and gender equality agenda,” Morsy emphasized. She considers the Salzburg Media Academy to be an ideal platform to discuss the relationship between media and women’s rights issues and to come up with innovative ways to improve it. The diversity that the seventy-six students present at the Academy, Morsy believes, will create the perfect atmosphere to discuss this topic comprehensively, and develop media tools that could be applied by the UNDP in their work of achieving gender equality. “I think the combination of students we have this year, from Arab to western, is a good opportunity to hear and listen to perspectives from different countries and maybe a solution in one country could be applied to another Arab country,” Morsy said. She also expressed her desire for this partnership, of the academy with the UNDP, to continue in the future with more of her colleagues coming to share their expertise with the students in the coming years. “It is a great honor for UNDP Regional Bureau of Arab States to be partnering with the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. We hope it can be a ritual to bring more UNDP colleagues to the academy. We have media, sustainability development, we have economic empowerment, different colleagues that could partner with the Salzburg academy. Looking forward to more UNDP colleagues coming next year.”

To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of BeirutAmerican University of SharjahBournemouth UniversityJordan Media InstituteEmerson CollegeIberoamericana UniversityPontificia Universidad Catolica ArgentinaSt. Pölten University of Applied SciencesChinese University of Hong KongUniversity of MarylandUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.

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Short Films Premiere at Salzburg Media Academy
Short Films Premiere at Salzburg Media Academy
Salzburg Global Seminar staff 
Long-serving faculty member Roman Gerodimos premiered his two short films at the ninth annual Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change on Monday, August 3, 2015. Students of the program were treated to the world premiere of At the Edge of the Present, a short film on “urban coexistence”, as well as an advanced preview of the first cut the forthcoming film A Certain Type of Freedom, which focuses on youth and the city. Gerodimos, principal lecturer in Global Current Affairs in the Media School at Media Academy partner school, Bournemouth University and leading commentator on Greek political affairs, acted as producer on the two short films, which are narrated by London-based actor, Sam Booth. Ahead of the premier, Gerodimos explained that the two films are “slightly experimental in nature.” “They blend primary and secondary academic research with photos from 40 cities from around the world in an effort to communicate ideas and debates around cities, urban coexistence, young people and media to broader audiences,” he added. In addition to Monday’s screening, the films are available online via Vimeo, and will be screened at academic conferences and festivals around the world. For more information on the films and other works of Roman Gerodimos, please visit: http://www.romangerodimos.com/  

To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of BeirutAmerican University of SharjahBournemouth UniversityJordan Media InstituteEmerson CollegeIberoamericana UniversityPontificia Universidad Catolica ArgentinaSt. Pölten University of Applied SciencesChinese University of Hong KongUniversity of MarylandUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.

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Ivan Sigal - "I am interested to see whether students here might come up with some other model that we haven’t thought of"
Ivan Sigal - "I am interested to see whether students here might come up with some other model that we haven’t thought of"
Rachitaa Gupta 
Global Voices has partnered with the ninth annual Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change to present students with a challenge and encourage them to come up with innovative media solutions for the same in the three weeks they will be working at the academy. Established in 2005, Global Voices, is an online volunteer community of 800 writers, analysts, online media experts, and translators that curates and verifies underreported stories from 167 countries and translates them in to 35 global languages. “Global voices is a community of largely volunteer writers, editors and translators from all over the world, who concentrate on reporting and covering conversation, stories and perspectives that come out of citizen media, blogs, social media that focus on the global south,” explained Ivan Sigal, a Salzburg Fellow and the Executive Director at Global Voices. He had last visited Salzburg Global in 2009 when he participated in the Strengthening Independent Media initiative. Global Voices was founded with the objective of providing an online platform that could pick up “stories that are underrepresented or misrepresented coming out of localities and making them understandable and finding larger audiences for them.” “It is about not just the right to be heard but the opportunity to listen across cultures, across countries and across languages,’ said Sigal. Through a large base of volunteer translators, Global Voices publishes stories in 35 global languages. Since, for the most part, it is the volunteers who translate the stories, they also get to decide which stories get translated in to which languages, based on their interest. “Well it may be true that in few world languages there’s international news. In many languages there’s not very much. So it’s actually an interesting resource to help people find information about other countries in languages they can read,” reiterates Sigal. The online media platform doesn’t just strive to make stories from marginalized communities global, but also wants to reach these groups with stories from other parts of the world. However, due to several inequities, lack of resources, economic barriers, and government policies, there are lot of barriers that prevent them from reaching these populations. Sigal said the question of overcoming these barriers and gaps was a core part of their work and something they were constantly working on, like by speaking out against online censorship and supporting new ways for people to gain access to the Internet. “We have two major programs. One, which focuses on restriction to access because of development issues, inequities, economic-political barriers, gender barriers, and resource barriers. And one about rights, about restrictions to speech, surveillance, privacy rights, and censorship. So it’s a big part of what we do," he specified. Bridging communities is just one of the challenges that they are facing. Sigal said making the online communities like theirs relevant at a social scale was also important. This was the challenge that Global Voices decided to present to the students of the media academy. “How do we grow, how do we make our work viable and interesting, relevant for societies? And that means both - do we grow in a way that is more inclusive, that changes the structure of the information sharing or do we seek to grow by sharing and syndicating our content and republishing it so that it is seen by a social level audience. And those things are not mutually exclusive. We are working on both models and I am interested to see whether students here might come up with some other model that we haven’t thought of,” he said. As this is the first time Global Voices has partnered with the media academy, Sigal stated he was more curious to see the results of the three weeks of collaborations between the students. “I am always interested to hear from and get feedback from communities outside of Global Voices about our work. I am very interested in critical thinking about what we do, which always helps us to become better. And I thought this would be a great opportunity for us to learn to see what others think about our work and also to present our work to other people. And hopefully to share some of our experiences with the academy.”

To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of BeirutAmerican University of SharjahBournemouth UniversityJordan Media InstituteEmerson CollegeIberoamericana UniversityPontificia Universidad Catolica ArgentinaSt. Pölten University of Applied SciencesChinese University of Hong KongUniversity of MarylandUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.

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Margot Steenbergen - "I am very curious to see through all that brainstorming what comes out of it"
Margot Steenbergen - "I am very curious to see through all that brainstorming what comes out of it"
Rachitaa Gupta 
Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre has partnered with the ninth Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices - Justice, Rights and Social Change to present students with a challenge and encourage them to come up with innovative media solutions for the problem in the three weeks they will be working at the academy. The Climate Centre, a Public Benefit Organization under Netherlands law, is a specialist reference centre of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) with the aim to help the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and its partners reduce the impacts of climate change and extreme-weather events on vulnerable people. “In our work, we combine science, policy, and practice. And in order to ensure that valuable information is retained, we have taken up an increasingly large role in the field of learning and uptake,” explained Margot Steenbergen, Program Officer at the Red Cross and Red Crescent Climate Centre. Steenbergen is mainly involved in learning and the uptake of information. She led a workshop at the media academy, where students got to play a game developed by the Climate Centre to understand the value of climate services and its uses during policy making. “It [games] is found to be particularly effective over the years… Games are a fun but serious way of helping humanity tackle the complexities, volatilities and uncertainties that could be the hallmarks of the “new normal” for the global climate. But I think it is not just the games. We make use of a larger toolbox of participatory methods," shared Steenbergen. A part of Climate Centre team has just begun work on the CRUA project – Community Resilience in Urban Areas, which is targeting: Hungary, Northern Ireland, and Denmark and has decided to share this project with the students as a challenge to come up with innovative media solutions for it during the three weeks of the media academy. “Over the last years there is found to be an increase in floods happening [in European nations] and damage was happening as a result of these floods. Not only to properties but also to human lives. I believe over 3.4M people were affected since 2004,” stated Steenbergen. Large amount of people are being affected during flooding in urban settings, especially in British Isles and Central Europe, and Steenbergen said their research shows that people in European setting depend on authorities a lot during disasters. "Certain situations extend beyond the capacity of the authorities and hence, it can be helpful for people to be resilient," said Steenbergen. The CRUA project focuses on empowering urban population by building their emotional and community resilience to better respond to natural disasters as a community and decrease their dependency on the authorities. “It is simply impossible to rely on authorities for everything. We can for lot of things and systems are in place and work really well but you cannot deal with every single vulnerable person or object and try to ensure their safety. It is not feasible,” emphasized Steenbergen. She said that was just part of the problem though. The other issue during such disasters was the lack of “social cohesion”, a characteristic of rural areas, in the urban settings. “Our aim is to increase the community resilience in these urban settings by ensuring two things – better preparedness for both, before and after a flood. So, what are we doing, having the roles better defined, for example, through family plans and community plans. Other is aiming for an increase in cohesion in doing so. It doesn’t look at material damage alone but also at the psychosocial aspect of it.” According to Steenbergen, the project, she presented the students with, focuses on creating innovative tools for community engagement in European settings and “is slightly out of the ordinary for us, but I think particularly well suited for the purpose of this academy.” “I am very curious to see what is next. I know this is a very intense process for the students. They have extremely long days. They are all stuck here in this mini reality so I am very curious to see through all that brainstorming what comes out of it.”

To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of BeirutAmerican University of SharjahBournemouth UniversityJordan Media InstituteEmerson CollegeIberoamericana UniversityPontificia Universidad Catolica ArgentinaSt. Pölten University of Applied SciencesChinese University of Hong KongUniversity of MarylandUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.

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Ithiel de Sola Pool Lecture 2015 - full text
Ithiel de Sola Pool Lecture 2015 - full text
Lucio Mesquita Filho 
Every year, Salzburg Global Seminar invites an eminent speaker to deliver a lecture on the theme of the Impact of Communications Technology on Society and Politics in honor of three-time Salzburg Global faculty member Ithiel de Sola Pool. This year's lecture was delivered by Lucio Mesquita Filho, newly appointed director of BBC Monitoring as part of the ninth annual Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change.

Monitoring the News and the Challenge News Providers Face in the Digital Era

I would like to start by explaining a bit more about BBC Monitoring, the BBC department I currently run. We were created in 1939, initially to provide the British government with access to foreign radio broadcasts.  Since 1943 we have been based at Caversham Park, a stately home in Reading, about 30 minutes by train from central London. The media world has changed considerably but what we do today, in essence, remains very similar to what we did in the 40s. We monitored and continue to monitor what is now commonly called Open Source content. In other words, radio, television, newspapers, news agencies and, increasingly, digital media, including the internet and social media.  The key point here is that what we monitor must be open to others.  In other words, they must be available and open – we don’t go to closed sites or use other means to access websites or social media accounts. Today we have about 400 staff not only in Reading but also in 10 locations around the world, including Delhi, Kabul, Tashkent, Baku, Moscow, Kiev, Cairo and Nairobi. We also engage some 200 freelance contributors. As the world is a big place, back in the 40s BBC Monitoring established a partnership with what is now known as the Open Source Center  the US government department tasked with the same job as ours. By doing so, we manage to be more efficient by avoiding duplication. For instance, OSC may look after the monitoring of media sources in Latin America whilst we concentrate on the former Soviet Union. We are funded through the licence fee British households pay to fund the BBC and our observations and analysis are used by BBC News to enhance our coverage to audiences in the UK and, through the World Service, BBC World News and bbc.com, audiences around the world. We not only provide BBC colleagues with background information and analysis to help report major stories like the situation in the former Soviet Union or the growth of IS in Syria and Iraq but, by observing open source content, we can also break stories.  Our content is also consumed by the British government and, increasingly, by commercial customers. By effectively being paid to watch TV, listen to the radio, read newspapers and follow what is being discussed on the internet and social media – not a bad job, actually! – we are also well positioned to understand the revolution currently happening in the media sector around the world.

The new media landscape

If BBC Monitoring was vital at the time it was created because of the scarcity of sources of information, we are vital now because of the explosion of sources the digital era brought about. It used to be said that freedom of the press was limited to those who owned one. Now, anyone with access to the internet and a twitter account can make the news.  That’s what I would like to talk a bit more about: the radical changes to the media landscape at a global scale and how this in impacting on the way we produce and use news. I will try and avoid overloading us all with big numbers and long lists but just to illustrate the media revolution we are going through, here are some interesting stats. Naturally, you are all familiar with YouTube.  Google, its owners, say that they have more than 1 billion users across the world, with hundreds of millions of hours of video watched every day. They also say 300 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute of the day. That’s 18 thousand minutes of video content uploaded every minute.  18 thousand minutes in one single minute. Or 300 minutes every second. It’s hard to pin down exactly how many television stations – traditional or via the internet – exist in the world but a good estimate is that they total between 10 and 15 thousand.  In other words, YouTube alone has more video uploaded in a minute than ALL television stations in the world, put together, are able to broadcast during that same minute. And I am not adding here videos uploaded through other digital services, including social media sites like Facebook, which are seeing a huge growth in video content, too.

The Future of News

I think we are living through a brilliant and exciting time when it comes to media and journalism. But also full of pitfalls. For anyone interested in reporting the world – finding, telling and sharing stories – so much is possible as the entry barriers become negligible. A decade ago, people outnumbered connected devices by about 10 to one. Last year, mobile phones outnumbered people for the first time. And the whole thing will be completely inverted by 2020, with 10 connected devices for every person on earth. Obviously, this isn’t an even process across the globe but these devices are less and less the preserve of the rich and are becoming a much more universal offer. This year’s Reuters Institute Digital News Report – based on a survey with users from 12 countries - indicates that two thirds of smartphone users now use  their devices for news every week. But it also shows that there isn’t a single, uniform way markets are changing.  At one end of the spectrum, for instance, television still comfortably rules in France or Germany as the primary source of news whilst Americans, Australians and Fins already rely on the internet and social media as their main news source, with television trailing behind. It is also no surprise that the younger you are, the more likely you are to use digital platforms as your primary source of news. This is relevant. I always worry when a young journalist in the newsroom say ‘everyone on twitter is saying this or that’. Definining WHO is everyone is key! So, we know that the communications world is radically changing. But what does this all mean to us working or planning to work in the media, especially in news? At the BBC, we set out last year to consider the Future of News over the coming decade or so. We wanted to look not just at the BBC but at the news industry as a whole. Here’s a taste of what we heard and discussed with established and emerging media leaders: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-31008317 As you’ve seen, one of the biggest challenges we identified is that the explosion of possibilities does not necessarily mean we are better informed as a consequence. In the bustling digital world, in fact there less reporting and more noise. And the internet has ripped a hole in the business model of many great news organisations. Ironically, this means vast swathes of modern life are increasingly unreported or under-represented. Take local newspapers, for instance, especially in the rich world. In Britain alone, some 5 thousand editorial posts were lost across local and national press in a decade. Or take international news coverage. Reporters covering foreign news for US newspapers declined by nearly a quarter over the last decade.  And we are also seeing television news becoming a space for older audiences, as the young increasingly head to the internet to get their news. However, as Emily Bell, from the Tow Center for Digital Journalism has pointed out, the internet is not necessarily a neutral curator of the news.  And people in power are also finding they can speak directly to the public without having to face challenging questions from a reporter.   Perhaps we could say that the journalist’s main competitor is no longer another journalist. Often, it’s the subject of the story. It could be argued that this direct connection between people, corporations and political leaders is a positive move. It probably is. In part.  The drawback is that the era of greater connectivity is not necessarily leading to more accountability. The other contradiction is that people feel misinformed. There is more and more data, opinion and freedom of expression out there – but in turn that makes it harder to know what is really going on… This explosion of sources can even make it easier for those who want to manipulate news and information by creating their very own narrative and repeating them often. Even if they could be debunked relatively easily elsewhere in the digital world. I would like to illustrate this point with a couple of cases.  First, Russia. There, most people still rely heavily on television news as their prime source of information, especially outside the major cities. This has given the Kremlin a strong incentive to virtually control the television news output.  BBC Monitoring’s Russia media analyst, Stephen Ennis, can explain this in more detail  At the other end of the spectrum, many Jihadi movements, and especially ISIS, have mastered the use of the internet and social media to promote their causes and recruit new members. Mina al-Lami is one of the Jihadi media specialists at BBC Monitoring: (VIDEO – MINA) So what do we think all this means to established news operations like BBC News? We believe that in the internet age, the BBC is more necessary than ever.  The internet is not keeping everyone informed, nor will it.  There is the risk that everyone runs to the new, fashionable digital world thinking it is the solution to everything. In fact, the internet is also magnifying problems of information inequality, misinformation, polarisation and disengagement. The task remains unchanged: our job is to keep everyone well informed. This is what makes citizens better citizens. But we need to look hard at how we run our news operations. One of these big changes will be the way we serve our audiences. The first step by most media organisations was to develop their multimedia strategy. Typically, that meant bringing together, under one site, television, radio and text content. That was a big step but it is becoming clear that audiences want more than that. It is clear we will need nothing short of reinvention in order to keep everyone informed. For instance, we want to further develop our data journalism capabilities as an additional way of holding people and organisations to account.  We also want to work on more personalised news – this is not just about a personalised index with stories you may be interested in but also a new approach to reporting and editing. And to remain relevant to a much more engaged audience, we must turn large parts of the news into something you do, rather than something you just get. Not everything will work and many will also evolve or morph into something else – after all, in this new media world, the life span of concepts and even platforms can be very short. When you have a chance, have a look at BBC Trending – what we like to see as our bureau on the internet. It reports on what’s been shared around the world but, crucially, why it matters. Or try Outside Source on BBC World News and the UK’s BBC News Channel, with real time news from the heart of the BBC newsroom, bringing together the BBC’s network of reporters and analysts with the latest news trends and feedback on twitter and facebook. My colleagues at BBC Monitoring are regulars on Outside Source. And there’s BBC Shorts – 15 second video news reports; or Go Figure, our information graphics offer currently growing audiences on Instagram. And here’s the challenge to us all. The uneven level of digital take up around the world, the differences in age and preferences, the relentless addition of new technology without the removal of older ones mean will need to grasp both broadcasting to mass audiences and providing personalised services streamed to the individual if we are to maintain our goal to keep everyone informed. We will need to have content for thinking fast and slow – the bitesize breaking news leading to the investigations, analysis and reporting essential to help us get to the bottom of each issue. We will need to have content that appeals to the increasingly big TV screens at home as well as the small ones on smartphones. So, in the exciting, but at times messy and noisy digital age, the need for news – accurate and fair, insightful and independent – is greater than ever. We are lucky because we are living through another media revolution – it must be a bit like how people felt when the printing press was developed, when radio came about at the beginning of the last century, followed by the transformation caused by television when it took off in the 50s. Our task – especially yours as you the new generation of media professionals – is to come up with the ways, concepts and devices to fulfil this need.

To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of BeirutAmerican University of SharjahBournemouth UniversityJordan Media InstituteEmerson CollegeIberoamericana UniversityPontificia Universidad Catolica ArgentinaSt. Pölten University of Applied SciencesChinese University of Hong KongUniversity of MarylandUniversity of MiamiUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.

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Lucio Mesquita - "I think we are living through brilliant and exciting times when it comes to media and journalism. But also full of pitfalls"
Lucio Mesquita - "I think we are living through brilliant and exciting times when it comes to media and journalism. But also full of pitfalls"
Rachitaa Gupta 
During the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices - Justice, Rights and Social Change, Lucio Mesquita, the newly appointed director of BBC Monitoring, delivered the Ithiel De Sola Pool Lecture on 'Monitoring the News and the Challenge News Providers Face in Digital Era'. BBC Monitoring is a branch of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) that provides round-the-clock monitoring of open source media across the world to the BBC and commercial news organizations. During his lecture, Mesquita discussed the role of BBC Monitoring since the time of its conception and its evolution in the past 75 years. BBC Monitoring was established in 1939 at a time of scarcity of information sources and provided the BBC with access to foreign radio broadcasts. However, the advent of the digital era has seen an overwhelming flood of information online, especially with the rise of social media and user-generated content, providing BBC Monitoring with a new challenge: not finding new news sources but keeping up with and making sense of the growing swell of "open source" content online. In light of this digital explosion, Mesquita discussed the future of news and the challenges faced by news providers. "We not only provide BBC colleagues with background information and analysis to help [them] report major stories like situation in the former Soviet Union or the growth of IS in Syria and Iraq, but by observing open source content, we can also break stories," Mesquita explained.  He gave the example of Malaysia Airlines passenger jet, Flight MH17 which was allegedly brought down by a Russian-supplied missile shot by rebels in the conflict region between Eastern Ukraine and Russia. According to Mesquita, BBC Monitoring was the first one to notice a post about it on social media. Mesquita said that since its creation in 1939, BBC Monitoring has become ever more vital. The media landscape is radically shifting with an explosion of sources changing how news is produced and used. He cited that as much video is uploaded to YouTube every minute as broadcast by all the TV stations in the world in that same minute. In this world, we still need to make sense of the news. "Your generation," he said to the students from five continents present, "must figure out how to do this." Read our Storify for the highlights from Lucio Mesquita's keynote speech and the complete social media coverage. Read Lucio Mesquita's lecture in full.
To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of Beirut, American University of Sharjah, Bournemouth University, Jordan Media Institute, Emerson College, Iberoamericana University, Pontificia Universidad Catolica Argentina, St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, University of Maryland, University of Miami, University of Rhode Island, University of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.
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Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change - Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change
Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change - Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change
Rachitaa Gupta 
This year the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices - Justice, Rights, and Social Change will see over 70 students and a dozen faculty members from 25 countries spanning over six continents come together for a unique three week program on media literacy and engaged global citizenship. For the past eight years, participants have been gathering annually in Salzburg to work in international teams and across disciplines on dynamic media literacy action plans that address some of the largest challenges our world faces today. This summer, faculty and students of the 2015 Salzburg Academy will engage with three NGO partners: Red Cross Crescent; The United Nations Development Program; and Global Voices. These organizations will be visiting the 2015 Academy to explain their work, their use of and relationships with media, and the local, regional and global “problem space” that they have identified as being of concern.  With the help and direction of the NGO partners, students and faculty at the 2015 Academy will build MAPs — Media Action Plans — to help understand the affordances and limitations of media for social impact. They will work collaboratively to build prototypes and pedagogies that explore how digital media platforms, word and image-based tools, and journalistic storytelling can address major social and civic challenges in the world today. With a strength of over 400 students and 50 faculty members, the Salzburg Academy has worked extensively in the past eight years to produce entrepreneurial plans for media innovation, and a network of young innovators that work to lead and invent the future media industries best suited for success in digital culture. The Salzburg Academy Fellows have also worked to produce global case studies that explore media’s role in the world - across borders, cultures, and divides; digital vignettes that show media’s impact on the world; and global media literacy models for engaging communities to be more sustainable and vibrant in the digital culture. Digital media are reshaping civic life from how we consume and share information to how we understand and communicate about ideas and issues we care about. While the impact of digital media on our culture can seem overwhelming and dire at times, it has also led to a host of new and innovative ways to engage and activate communities.  Media Action Plans explore how digital media can build stronger communities of action around issues that matter. The 2015 Salzburg Academy will explore three key global issues of our time — rights, expression and responsiveness — in collaboration with the Red Cross, the UNDP, and Global Voices.  This year faculty and visiting scholars will provide grounding lectures on media literacy, news literacy and civic media, as well as lead screenings and facilitate workshops and discussions.  Over the next three weeks, the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change will see students and faculty work together on using media to empower communities of action. Much of the learning will be student initiated and driven, and will occur through work on case studies, civic art projects and multimedia production.
To read and join in with all the discussions in Salzburg, follow the hashtag #sac2015 on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Civic Voices: Justice, Rights, and Social Change is part of the Salzburg Global series “Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change” and is  held in partnership with American University of Beirut, American University of Sharjah, Bournemouth University, Jordan Media Institute, Emerson College, Iberoamericana University, Pontificia Universidad Catolica Argentina, St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, University of Maryland, University of Miami, University of Rhode Island, University of St Cyril and Methodius, and University of Texas.
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